The joy of failure

We are trained from childhood to associate negative emotions with failure. This leads to the desire to disassociate one’s self with that outcome that was deemed a failure and therefore lose incentive to examine the situation carefully in the end. The greatest lessons are truly learned from failure. The greatest people in history have talked about their failures and what they’ve learned from them. As Thomas Edison once said “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work”. John Lee Dumas of Entrepreneur On Fire always asks his entrepreneur guests about that great big failure and there is always a lesson to be learned from it. Those entrepreneurs have also attributed the success they have now to that great big failure they experienced. However, in the society we live in, the need to appear almost always perfect is causing us to miss out on life’s greatest lessons. We don’t push ourselves too hard or set goals that are seemingly unrealistic due to our fear of failure. To aid in my goal of getting out of my comfort zone for 2015, I’m setting goals that seem somewhat impossible. I need to test myself. It’s not only about the success of it but it’s about becoming comfortable with the concept of failure and understanding the true joy of it all. It’s about being able to look back on experiences and pull as much knowledge from it and use that to move forward in achieving more success. I am giving my all to accomplish my goals but knowing that the process is about learning and building character, makes me feel as if I’ve succeeded regardless of the outcome.

I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life and that is why I succeed”…Michael Jordan

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Ask and it shall be given unto you

Last week I spoke with my manager and told him that I’ll be leaving the organisation at the end of February 2015 and I’ll submit my resignation letter sometime in January 2015, as a month’s notice is required. A few days later, I met up with him for my assessment. At the end of the assessment, he assigned me new tasks more reflective of the work I’m passionate about, with the hope that the tasks will convince me to stay. I have been as honest as I can with my manager about my preference to work on mobile applications and how I feel about the work I’m currently doing. I’m excited about what I’m doing now as the knowledge and skills are transferrable and more in line with mobile application development. I can’t say right now when I’ll leave but I will definitely be completing these assigned tasks before I depart.

Going after what you want

I’ve been at the National Insurance Board of Trinidad and Tobago (NIBTT) since May of this year and the project I’m currently working on, is not one I’m passionate about but I come to work and do what I can. Yesterday I made a phone call to June Marcano, Project Analyst who works directly with the Executive Manager for Information Technology at NIBTT. I enquired about the possibility of NIBTT producing mobile applications as my passion is mobile application development. Sometimes in life we’re placed in situations that may not suit us perfectly and it may be easy to walk away but I know I’m here at this organisation for a purpose and I need to figure that out. I know the current position I hold is not for me, so I need to exhaust all my options and see how best I can add value to the organisation before I make the final decision to leave. I should have a conversation with the Executive Manager before the end of the week to discuss the possibility of such a project and I hope it’s a venture the company is ready and willing to embark upon and one that I can contribute significantly towards.

Full Time Lecturing

Since my mom has been dealing with some health issues for the most part of this year, I decided that I would spend more time in Trinidad and Tobago instead of leaving to head for the UK. As a result, I’ve had to reassess my career goals and decide on a new way forward. I currently work at the National Insurance Board and I lecture part time at the University. This work schedule has left little time for me to focus on my mobile apps, the business ventures I would like to pursue as well as any community service work I would like to do. So I’ve decided to go back to lecturing full time. Last week I met with the Head of the Information Communication and Technology (ICT) programmes at the University of Trinidad and Tobago to discuss my return and how I can contribute to the programmes currently being delivered and the University as a whole. I believe this is the best move for me right now. While I will not be employed as an iOS Developer, at the University I will be given the privilege of teaching students how to develop mobile applications as well as many other software development topics. The teaching schedule will also give me time to work on my current mobile apps and develop new applications that I have been thinking of for quite some time. This is actually the perfect fit for me right now and I am excited for the move. Once the Administrative and Human Resources side of things are sorted out in time, I would be starting from January 2015. So in the mean time, I’m visualising myself there doing one of the things I’m most passionate about while making a difference in the lives of others.

A little change for 2015

This blog was intended to chronicle my journey towards securing an iOS Developer role in the UK. Since my mom fell ill, that goal has been placed on hold and the blog’s content has taken a different turn. Lately I’ve been thinking about how I’ll begin to transition this blog from what is currently is, which is a series of posts about the work I do, to a blog more representative of its name “Help Me Land That Job”. I have many ideas and I intend to designate one weekend in December to do some further brainstorming, planning and organising of this blog for 2015. When my lecturing duties come to an end at the end of this month, it will definitely provide me with some free time to focus on the blog and updating my iPhone apps. Hopefully my intentions for 2015 for this blog will help make it a more helpful resource for others trying to land their dream job.

Sometimes you just have to ignore

At the National Insurance Board of Trinidad and Tobago (NIBTT), I’m currently working on a web application. For the past month, I’ve been having numerous errors with the DOJO Framework that has caused me frustration beyond belief. I couldn’t understand why this code would be released with so many errors. Yesterday, my co-worker Darindra eased all my woes with respect to this framework and it was simply a matter of ignoring the errors in the Eclipse preferences. He too encountered the same problem and it took him some time to figure out the issue. This approach may not work for all code in all programming languages. For example, some deprecated code in Objective-C needs to either removed completely or edited. This has given me a more positive perspective towards the project and has me really excited about moving forward.

Significance before Success

This weekend I spent most of my time preparing a proposal to submit to a company for the development of a tablet application. The same application was previously developed for the company by another vendor but that vendor really did not have the company’s best interest at heart, so the company is now forced to have the application completely redone. It’s really sad when companies do poor work for clients. It’s one thing to not know most of the techniques for your craft and lack experience but it’s another thing to intentionally deceive a client for the sake of money. In business, what matters most is relationships and providing value to customers. Before you seek to become a person of success, become a person of significance. When you provide value to customers there will always be a pay cheque waiting for you and success will eventually follow. It’s best to be known as someone clients can trust and someone who will always have their best interest at heart. Life is governed by cyclic laws and that which you give out will surely come back to you.